Posts Tagged ‘project’

Riding Through Mountains (of Data)

Tuesday, May 11th, 2010

(Here is the documentation for my thesis project at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program. PDF version here.)

Riding through Mountains of Data:
Visualizations of Cycling

Robert Carlsen
Interactive Telecommunications Program
Tisch School of the Arts
New York University

Abstract

This project attempts to describe the cycling experiences of several riders in New York City through a series of visualizations. Specifically, I am interested to discover if riders similar to myself share a common experience through which a sense of connection could be derived.

Cyclists were encouraged to record their travels using their personal mobile devices running Mobile Logger, a custom iPhone application.
Log data was uploaded by the application to an online database in near real-time during each ride. This data was analyzed and filtered to provide source material for the resulting visualizations and system “dashboard” at http://mobilelogger.robertcarlsen.net.

Keywords

Cycling, New York City, sensors, iPhone, visualization, mapping, tracking, logging, mobile, application, bicycle

(more…)

Mobile Logger has gone global

Saturday, April 24th, 2010

globalThe Mobile Logger application has been public for a couple of weeks and has (surprisingly, to me) been used in every continent, save Antarctica. I first noticed several events in the database from Australia, then the UK. I was mostly catching these events by coincidence when I was looking over my own data and wondered just where (in the world) these other users were logging from.

For Earth Day, I generated a map of the global users of Mobile Logger and put it on the status page. While the historical data is really neat, and humbling to know that people all over have tried this app, the real-time data is captivating. I added the city of the most recent event and a pulsing marker to the map. Now, the location of the newest log is marked when the status page is updated. Next, I’d like to show it when several events have been logged at the same time.

That’s it for now…working on the next iteration of the visualizations. I’m thinking of some Feltron-inspired summary charts, then a more detailed array of specific data. Who knows?!

Close to Home

Monday, March 1st, 2010

Our assignment last week was to use Foursquare to log our daily travels. This week, we were asked to use a classmate’s Foursquare check-in history as the source of our visualizations. I was given Bryan Lence’s data and set off to see what was there.

blence_map_1024

Over the past few weeks I’ve been teaching myself the R “environment for statistical computing and graphics“. It’s an open source project and has a doubly steep learning curve (for me, at least) of an unfamiliar syntax and medium (statistics). I can see it’s power for visualizations, however, when used to reveal interesting associations which can be further refined in other graphics software (in this case, Illustrator).

(more…)

LEITv: Fly or Pie show

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010

flypie-votingThis assignment was to develop a concept around a two-screen, live event experience; specifically, using TV and computer via internet. Our group’s concept was a variety-style, Gong Show inspired show with binary voting from viewers to determine via aggregate whether a performance was Fly (a rousing success) or Pie (a miserable failure) which received a whipped cream pie in the face. (We’re a classy outfit here..) (more…)

OCR for iPhone source

Tuesday, January 12th, 2010

ocr_gobbledygookThe source code for the Tesseract OCR for iPhone project has been published. It’s really simple – more of a skeleton, proof-of-concept project than anything else. Still, though, it’s neat to have nearly point-and-shoot text conversion in your pocket.

The project page is: Pocket OCR

The source code is available at github: http://github.com/rcarlsen/Pocket-OCR

There is certainly a lot of improvement to be made. Automatic color correction. Page layout recognition. Perspective correction…the list could go on. The code is there, so…fork away!

(the thumbnail is a bit tongue-in-cheek…but honest. good conversion requires a good source image: well-lit, macro, focused and tightly cropped seems best)

ITP 1-in-1: bike blinky!

Sunday, October 4th, 2009

blinky_on_bikeFor the 1-in-1 Project as part of ITP’s 30th anniversary celebration I over-engineering the simple bicycle blinky light. Why go for a simple, off-the-shelf blinky light when we can build a much more complicated one ourselves?!

I’m creating an animated display, which changes to solid red while braking.

Update: (5:26) It’s been a long night, but it all came together. I wish I could have finished at the floor, but sometimes you need to go to your cave. The bike blinky light is all I could have asked for…it’s obnoxious, it’s animated, it has a handlebar control to switch to a flashing warning mode. (more…)

Thinking Physically: BlindSight presentation

Monday, May 4th, 2009

This is the final project presentation of BlindSight for the ITP Thinking Physically class in Spring 2009. BlindSight is is a collaboration between Robert Carlsen and Andrew Styer.

BlindSight aims to explore synesthesia by associating certain body positions with visual hallucinations induced by photic stimulation. In other words, flashing lights at various frequencies seems to cause visual patterns to appear for the viewer. Simple wearable sensors adjust the frequency of the flashes and thus provide various patterns. (more…)

Using Arduino in Xcode

Saturday, February 28th, 2009

While the Arduino IDE (Integrated Development Environment) is relatively simple way to program the Arduino hardware, I found myself getting frustrated by it’s limited features after spending time using Xcode and Eclipse. There are some simple tutorials available online which demonstrate how to set up Xcode for programming the Arduino, however these didn’t “just work” for me, and were targeting arduino-0.10.

I made a few (simple in hindsight) changes to the project which has worked well for me so far. (more…)

Toy Design: SkipDraw*

Tuesday, January 27th, 2009
*(the name of the toy is still under consideration)
skipdraw_center

SkipDraw
A classic toy reinvented for the active kid of today.

Wear the SkipDraw on your ankle and spin it on the floor around your feet. As it spins, the LED lighted cross will rotate independently. See it draw images of light in mid air as you skip in the center.

Features:

  • Encourages kids to play outside of their rooms.
  • Promotes physical exercise.
  • Can be played indoors or outdoors.
  • Compact storage when not in use.
  • Is still engaging in daylight or without the batteries.
  • Entertaining to watch.

(more…)

ITP Winter Show 2008

Wednesday, December 17th, 2008

This evening is the first night of the 2008 Winter Show at ITP. My Cloud Reader project has been included, and I’ll be attending to it each night in the main hallway – surrounded by other really interesting work. The atmosphere on the floor last night was energized…almost like a festival. I’m excited for the show, having come full circle from one year ago when I visited ITP just before applying to the program.

It doesn’t really feel that long ago; it also feels like a long time ago.

It’s going to be a long and exciting day.